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Senegal

Overview

Senegal supports a wide variety of agriculture and the sector employs the majority of the working population, most of whom are subsistence farmers. Consequently, the country is a major food importer. Farmers here face droughts and pests and often work with poor soil conditions. These factors all put Senegal’s main food crops – millet, rice, corn and sorghum – at risk, and can lead to rising food prices and social unrest. Groundnut and cotton are among the country’s main cash crops.

Senegal has placed agriculture at the centre of its strategy for economic and social development, as well as recognising its importance in achieving food and nutrition security. This is reflected in the national agriculture strategy, the ‘Programme d’Accélération de la Cadence de l’Agriculture Sénégalais 2014-2017’ (PRACAS), which forms part of the overall ‘Plan Sénégal Emergent’ to strengthen food security and reduce the trade deficit. 

Grow Africa Priority Activities in Senegal

  • Grow Africa initiated CAP-F deployment in Senegal with a sector stocktaking study, followed by preparation of a country roadmap based on recommendations emerging from consultation with country stakeholders. Complete deployment of CAP-F is anticipated in 20198 after stakeholder validation process of the roadmap.
  • Grow Africa value chain activities have been primarily concentrated on rice, given the government’s goal of food self-sufficiency and the need to establish a rice public-private partnership (PPP) in collaboration with Senegal’s Ministry of Agriculture. 
  • Given that rice is a regional priority and the main constraints on development of the sector – competitiveness and rice quality – are shared by several countries, Grow Africa has been working across markets with the aim of coordinating the various national and regional efforts and ensuring the inclusion of the private sector.

Grow Africa is continuing its work with Senegal’s rice sector in alignment with the country’s prioritization of this sector. The national policy for rice seeks to increase production to achieve self-sufficiency, which is currently only 60%.

Despite various efforts, there is currently no effective value chain organization to coordinate different parts of the rice value chain and address bottlenecks in an aligned way. To address this gap, Grow Africa is working to create a value chain platform in the rice sector, which will help support much-needed private sector investment. 

Additionally, Grow Africa has been working with the private sector in agriculture and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) under the Investment Facilitation Platform (IFP). This body – supported by the national investment promotion agency – is creating a forum for effective, business-oriented public-private dialogue. Through this mechanism, Grow Africa is supporting private sector participation in such dialogue with the end goal of helping to create an operating environment that supports investment in Senegal’s agriculture sector.

Key Results
  • Grow Africa initiated CAP-F deployment in Senegal with a sector stocktaking study, followed by preparation of a country roadmap based on recommendations emerging from consultation with country stakeholders. Complete deployment of CAP-F is anticipated in 2019 after stakeholder validation process of the roadmap.
  • Grow Africa value chain activities have been primarily concentrated on rice, given the government’s goal of food self-sufficiency and the need to establish a rice public-private partnership (PPP) in collaboration with Senegal’s Ministry of Agriculture
  • Grow Africa is also looking to undertaking an in-depth business case study for the establishment of regional rice value chain in West Africa, with specific focus on Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria, Niger and Senegal